Cistus incanus / Rock rose
Cistus incanus / Rock rose
Botany

South Europe is the home of the cistus incanus bush which has a pink-red blossom. Its aromatic and resinous scent lies over the typical macchia countryside with its low and dense expanses of bushes at harvesting time in the spring. Here, in one of the sunniest regions of Europe, the bush which loves heat and light prefers to grow on ground which is uncultivated and rich in magnesium. As a true survival expert, the grey-haired Cistus – or Rockrose – with its fireproof roots, ensures quick rejuvenation after the forest fires which frequently rage in the macchia: a very resistant early settler, robust and energetic, with high ecological significance.

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History

The use of cistus incanus can be traced back to the 4th century B.C. In the form of laboriously gained resin – so-called ladanum – the plant was brought to Egypt and the Sudan. Since this time, the grey-haired cistus has also been used as a tea to be drunk for pleasure and relaxation. From today’s point of view the method of gaining resin at that time causes some amusement. The shepherds drove their goats through the cistus thicket so that the sticky substance of the plant remained in their hair. Subsequently, the sticky coats were shorn off the animals and boiled in water. The valuable resin then remained on the surface of the water. The Christian churches still know resin from cistus incanus today as an important component of incense. The aromatic plant made international headlines in the year 1999: an expert jury awarded cistus incanus ssp. tauricus the title “European plant 1999”.

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Ingredients

Certain varieties of Cistus incanus have a very high content of big, complex and polyphenols (‘high polymer polyphenols’). They are also the secret behind Cystus 052®: These big molecules are to a large extent capable of surrounding viruses, bacteria and free heavy metals, so physically immobilising’ them with the result that they can hardly cause harm to our bodies.Cistus Incanus

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